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Favourite books about autism

CharlotteL's picture
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CharlotteL


Favourite books about autism

Tue 20 Oct 2015 9:15am
Topic: 

What are your favourite books about autism?

It might be fiction like the Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.

Or non-fiction like Steve Silberman's Neurotribes?

Personally, I've just started reading Neurotribes...so far so good! 

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Charlotte, Community Manager

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  • Buttercup's picture

    I read a lot anyway and over the last few years quite a bit of my reading has been about autism. My favourite is a book called 'Ido in Autismland' written by a severely autistic boy who is now 18 (he wrote the book between the ages of 12 and 15. In some ways he offers quite a different perspective to the one that is usually presented. He writes a lot about the mind/body disconnection which is not something you hear about a lot. He describes having a mind that is 'normal' but a body that won't do what he wants it to. It's an extraordinarily mature book; in parts it's extremely funny and a others it had me in tears. 

    I also like 'Look me in the Eye' by John Elder Robison. It is a view from the Aspergers end of the spectrum. Also very funny and poignant. 

    I started out reading books by parents or experts, but now I seek out books by people on the spectrum. 

    Neutotribes is on my to read list. When I get the time! 

    Amy - Community Champion
  • JosieB's picture

    Hi

     

    My favourite book when Tom was young was by Brenda Boyd and called "Parenting a Child with Asperger Syndrome".   Tom's Primary School also bought the book in and found it really helpful.

    I have just started reading "The Reason I Jump".

     

    Josie - Community Champion
  • JuliaM's picture

    Hi 

    Not really sure how forums work it's my first time, my daughters 13 and in the process of being diagnosed with high functioning Autisum. Now I've gone through all my weeping and wailing I'm feeling very lonely as people don't seem to understand the daily challenges that we go through and the strain on other family members, mostly her elder sister.  I could do with some advice on educating myself so I can help my daughter the best way possible, wether it be books or courses I'm desperate for any help. Could anybody advise me from there own experiences please. 

  • CharlotteL's picture

    Hi JuliaM.

    A huge welcome to our forum. 

    I'm sure others will be able to help you too, but have you checked out our 'Understanding autism' pages: https://www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk/understanding-autism 

    There is a section on diagnosis and challenging behaviours which you might find useful. 

     

    Charlotte, Community Manager
  • CharlotteL's picture

    Steve Silberman won the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction last night.

    He said on Facebook: "THANK YOU to the autistic people who gave me glimpses into their lives and guided my thoughts to a fuller appreciation of their beauty, creativity, and fierce determination to build a better world for all people with atypical minds. THANK YOU to the families of autistic people (particularly the Rosas and all their amazing friends) who shared their struggles and joys with me. "

    Charlotte, Community Manager
  • Buttercup's picture

    Julia M , I would highly recommend a book called 'Aspergirls' by Rudy Simone. Very readable, useful for those on the spectrum and advice for parents , things to watch out for that show your daughter might be struggling, how to help her achieve her potential etc.

    I have boys on the spectrum , so I don't have the experience of raising a girl with Aspergers, but I have many Aspergers tendencies, which is why I read the book. I read it in one sitting and found myself wishing I or my parents had had access to it when I was growing up. 

    There are quite a few other books about girls on the spectrum, but I haven't got round to reading them yet. 

    Amy - Community Champion
  • michaelz's picture
  • michaelz's picture

    "in a different key : the story of autism"

     

    written by john donovan and caren zucker

     

    to be published by penguin in january, 2016.

     

    the authors have set up a facebook page.

     

    i haven't read the book.

     

    https://www.facebook.com/In-A-Different-Key-The-Story-of-Autism-Jan-2016-1007982285913466/

     

  • michaelz's picture
  • michaelz's picture

    "nathan bishop" (a teenage character in the first part of slade house by david mitchell) is depicted as autistic.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slade_House

    abridged audio version from the bbc - originally broadcast on radio 4.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06sbhv7

    haven't heard the audio version so not sure how much they leave in about the autistic character.

    david mitchell has an autistic son IRL.

    i liked the book - it's a sort of sequel to `the bone clocks` but i guess it could be read on its own without pre-knowledge.

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