Did you know that autistic-like behaviours do not necessarily mean your child has autism? | Ambitious about Autism
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Did you know that autistic-like behaviours do not necessarily mean your child has autism?

Sibylle's picture
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Sibylle


Did you know that autistic-like behaviours do not necessarily mean your child has autism?

Sat 19 Aug 2017 2:00pm
Did you know that autistic-like behaviours do not necessarily mean your child has autism?
 
Are you worried about autistic-like behaviours because your child
• does not talk, play, interact, eat, respond or behave as you would expect at this age?
• shows repetitive or controlling behaviours like lining things up, flapping hands, tantrums or insisting on sameness?
• sometimes seems lost, shut off, passive or withdrawn, prefers to play alone and has no friends, or is overly active and unable to settle to anything?
 
Did you know that autistic-like behaviours
• do not necessarily mean your child has autism?
• are all human behaviours and responses, that can be seen in so-called normal people?
• can often change, when we understand what is really going on to create these difficulties?
 
Autism diagnoses are continue to rise, - and there is much confusion as to why this might be. Before considering a formal diagnostic process many parents are therefore looking for someone with a therapeutic outlook to help them explore what is really going on to create their child’s difficulties, and to help them to find the most effective solutions.
 
For over 20 Years I have witnessed unbelievable changes in children and their families. I believe that autistic behaviours are really coping strategies and an early sensory stress/trauma response that has got stuck with the individual unable to get out. Over 20 years of witnessing so many unbelievable changes in children and their families has only confirmed my conviction that
• autism isn’t a genetic or otherwise fixed ‘disease’ in need of behaviour modification, but a form of a meaningful emotional communication that can be understood, and can change
• the standard deficit checklists for establishing or diagnosing autism are ineffective and undermine the healthy developmental potential of child, parents and family
• defining someone as the sum of their deficits reduces them to a general ‘diagnosis’, instead of valuing them as a unique person with a human mind that is designed to change and develop

 

--
Sibylle Janert

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2 Comments

  • BelmontAllens's picture

    Sibylie

    I find your thoughts fascinating.... Our daughter recently turned 17 has just bee diagnosed with autism - she seemed to "turn more and more autistic" i.e. display increasingly obvious autism traits in the last couple of years. Having developed "normally" and coped fine with the world and school work until age about 14-15- she has now retreated into herself and appears to have lost function e.g. she was predicted reasonable GCSE grades - two years ago but when it came to the exams she scored practically zero in all papers. She seemes overwhelmed and confused by any more than one instruction - when before she was capable of much more complex thought.

    She seems to have lost the ability to learn anything new - doesn't seem to know how (or want?) to plan ahead.

    She was born prematurely and there is one school of thought that some complex neurology deficiet is at play here but we are really struggling to understand where to go to find help...

     

     

    E and P Allen
  • BelmontAllens's picture

    Apologies meant to add - the obvious diagnosis of depression has been ruled out by her GP.... but I am interested in your suggestion that autistic traits may be just a coping mechanism. she is clearly not happy about something and has really lost her way.

    PS -she is a twin - her sister has had  - and continues to have - a complex medical history which requires numerous often unplanned hospital admissions

    sad

    E and P Allen

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